Debt Consolidation

You don’t need a loan to eliminate credit card debt. A debt management program consolidates all your credit card bills into one, lower monthly payment at a lower interest rate. You can be debt free in 3-5 years.

Debt Consolidation and Credit Consolidation Programs for 2018

What is Debt Consolidation?

The traditional method of consolidating debt is to take out one large loan from a bank and use that money to pay off several smaller debts.

That can be effective, unless you have a less-than-perfect payment history and low credit score, which means you may not be approved for a debt consolidation loan or the one you get will carry a high interest rate.

But you don’t need a bank loan to consolidate debts.

The debt management program at InCharge Debt Solutions will consolidate your bills, reduce your monthly payments and interest rates and you don’t need a loan.

InCharge credit counselors work with your creditors and get you a single, predictable monthly payment that you can afford. You choose the day of the month that works best for you based on your personal budget and payroll schedule. Make on-time monthly payments and you eliminate your credit card debt in 3-5 years.

Here are five reasons you should consider debt management as your consolidation option:

Benefits of the Debt Consolidation Alternative

One Consolidated Payment

Paying multiple debt payments is hard work. Mail gets lost, life gets busy and the late fees pile up. With the debt management plan, we make it easy. We consolidate debt into one payment.

Lower Your Interest Rates

If you qualify, we may be able to secure lower interest rates from your creditors.

Pay Off Your Debt Faster

How would you like to be debt free within a few years? Each year, thousands of our clients graduate to debt free status.

You Choose the Due Date

Ever feel like you are juggling too many payments with too many due dates? With InCharge’s debt management plan, you can schedule the exact day of the month that your single debit pays all of your debts. This means no more confusion over what needs to be paid when: your debts are all paid with one payment.

Free Financial Education

We can help you become debt free, but how do you stay that way? We’ll teach, motivate and inspire you to stay debt free. Our financial literacy program will teach you how to save money, build an emergency fund and set achievable financial goals.

Which Debts Can Be Consolidated?

The following debts are eligible for InCharge’s consolidation program:

  • Credit card debt
  • Medical debt
  • Past due utilities
  • Unsecured loans
  • Collection accounts
  • Payday loans

Excessive credit card debt – the thing that gets people in the most financial trouble – is the best reason to consolidate debt.

The average interest rates on credit cards in 2017 was 16.06%. The interest rate on debt consolidation loans depends on your credit score, but if your score was above 640, you could get a loan for as low as 7%.

Secured debts such as homes, property and automobiles can be refinanced, but are not considered good candidates for debt consolidation because you are placing a valuable asset at risk. The home could foreclosed or cars repossessed if you miss payments.

Signs You Should Consolidate Debt and Loans

Here are some signs that consolidating loans might be a good idea for you:

  • You are spending more money than you are making.
  • Your credit card balances are growing, not shrinking.
  • The interest payments on your credit card debt is exceeding the amount purchased each month.
  • You’re paying only the minimum payments on your debt, and even that is difficult.
  • You have been turned down for a credit card or store installment loan for having a high debt-to-income ratio.
  • You carry debt on more than 5 credit cards.
  • You are approaching or are at your credit card limits.
  • When bills come in the mail (or email) you dread opening them.
  • You carry a balance on credit cards with interest rates in excess of 18.99%.
  • Your credit score is falling.

How the Debt Consolidation Alternative Can Help You

According to data from the Federal Reserve, approximately 37% of Americans carry a credit card debt balance from month to month. Some people carry small balances. Others carry large balances. You may be somewhere in the middle. Carrying a balance over months, years, decades… adds up. The average credit card interest rate is around 15% APR. That’s $15.00 per year for every $100 you carry in debt. If you have $15,000 in debt, you’d be paying $2250 each year to hold that debt. And that’s only for one year. If you carry that same debt for 5 years, you’ve paid $11,250 to borrow $15,000.

It’s not easy to get out of debt. That’s where debt consolidation comes in. Here’s a scenario to help you better understand traditional debt consolidation. After you’ve read that, we’ll tell you how InCharge’s non profit debt consolidation alternative can capture all the benefits of traditional debt consolidation without the risks.

Consolidating Debt and Loans with a High Debt-to-Income Ratio

Anne, 32, was a high school teacher in debt. Anne starting using credit in college to pay for books and expenses. She graduated with a small balance on two cards: $2400. As a new teacher, Anne signed up for 2 more credit cards at her favorite clothing stores to pay for a professional wardrobe, accumulating $2500 more in debt. Over the next few years, Anne experienced a number of financial set-backs. She opened another credit card to help pay for a major car repair ($1500) and another to cover expenses when her roommate moved out with no notice ($2500).

Two years ago, Anne was laid off. As a teacher, she thought she had job security, but her state had a budget crisis and teachers with little seniority were the first to go. She was unemployed for one year and then re-hired the following year. With few options, Anne lived off her credit cards while unemployed, adding an additional $9000 to her debt. At 32, she owes $17,900 on 9 different credit cards. In some 2-week spans, Anne has to make 5 credit card payments. “It feels like a big payment is always due. I try not to look at the finance charges. It’s just too depressing. I can barely keep up.”

Anne is interested in consolidating debts. “Just having one payment to worry about each month would be a godsend.” When she looked into a traditional debt consolidation program, Anne faced a number of problems. Because be she had a very high debt-to-income ratio, she did not qualify for the the best interest rates. There were also high fees associated with taking out a large loan. Then Anne discovered InCharge’s debt consolidation alternative.

With InCharge’s debt consolidation alternative, Anne was able to consolidate all of her payments into one convenient monthly payment, without taking out a new loan. InCharge was also able to help Anne get lower interest rates on 7 of her 9 cards, meaning more of her payment each month would go to pay off the balance, than to interest. With the InCharge debt consolidation alternative, Anne will be debt free in 4 years and 2 months. “Having lived with credit card debt my entire adult life, I cannot tell you what it means to me to be debt free in a few years. Every time I make my one consolidated payment, I know I’m one month closer to my financial freedom.”

Debt consolidation lenders won’t qualify you for a loan if too much of your monthly income is dedicated to debt payments. If you find your debt-to-income ratio in excess of 50 percent, you should consider alternatives to debt consolidation, including consolidating without a loan. If you need help calculating your ratio, check out our article on how to calculate your debt-to-income ratio.

Debt Consolidation Calculator

Would debt consolidation save you money? Use this calculator to find out. Enter your current balances, monthly payments and interest rates under Current Debt Information. Enter the proposed interest rate and repayment period under under Consolidated Loan Information. Push submit. The calculator will show you how much you can save with a debt consolidation loan.


How to Get a Consolidation Loan

A debt consolidation loan can take a lot of the stress out of your financial life by reducing multiple monthly payments to just one payment to a single source.

However, he whole purpose of doing this is to reduce the interest rate you pay on debts as well as the amount you pay every month so it is important that have accurate financial records.

Here is a step-by-step sequence for getting a debt consolidation loan:

  1. Make a list of the debts you want to consolidate.
  2. Next to each debt, list the total amount owed, the monthly payment due and the interest rate paid.
  3. Add the total amount owed on all debts and put that in one column. Now you know how much you need to borrow with a debt consolidation loan.
  4. Add the monthly payments you currently make for each debt and put that number in another column. That gives you a comparison number for your debt consolidation loan.
  5. The next step is to approach a bank, credit union or online lending source and ask for a debt consolidation loan (sometimes referred to as a personal loan) that covers the total amount owed. Ask how much the monthly payment will be and what interest rate charges are.
  6. Finally, do a comparison between what you currently pay each month and what you would pay with a debt consolidation loan.

Your new monthly payment and interest rate should be lower than the total you were paying. If not, try negotiating with your lender to lower both rates. If you’ve been a good customer at that bank or credit union, they may take that into consideration and reduce your rates.

If you still can’t get a lower monthly payment and interest rate than you were paying, call a nonprofit credit counseling agency and investigate another debt-relief option like a debt management program or debt settlement.

Debt Consolidation Alternatives

It is easy to accumulate debt. It isn’t always easy figuring the best way out of it.

Fortunately, there are several options, at least one of which should help you get your finances back on track.

Change your habits

The most effective alternative to consolidating debt is learning to live on less than what you make. In other words, make a budget … and stick to it. Take the time to list income and expenses, then adjust those numbers until the column under income exceeds expenses. There are plenty of easy-to-use apps that should help make this process workable, if you are disciplined about it.

Personal loan

These are relatively easy loans to get from banks or credit unions, but only if you have a good credit score. If you’re struggling, the interest rate they charge might not be much different than the one you currently are paying.

Home equity loan

If you have equity in your house – it’s worth more than what you owe on it – you can borrow against that amount. The interest rates on home equity loans are lower than interest on credit cards, but there is a significant risk here: You could lose the home if you miss payments on this loan.

Home equity line of credit (HELOC)

This is often confused with the home equity loan, but the two differ. A HELOC is a line of credit for a fixed amount of money. You draw from that line as needed, usually for a 5-10 year period. The repayment period starts after that and typically runs 10-20 years. By contrast, a home equity loan is a lump sum payment with a fixed interest rate and payoff period.

Balance transfers

Many companies offer credit cards that allow you to transfer the balance on your cards to a new one with a 0% interest charge. You must have good-to-excellent credit to qualify for one. The 0% interest is known as an “introductory rate” that expires, typically after 6-12 months. The rates on the cards then jump to between 15% and 25%. There also could be transfer and late fees applied. This could be a dangerous move, unless you are sure you can pay off all your debt during the introductory rate period.

DIY (Do It Yourself)

Start by calling your card company and asking them to lower your interest rate. You also could attack the debt by paying off the card that has the lowest balance first (“snowball” method) and moving up from there. Another option is to start with the one that has the highest interest rate (“avalanche” method), pay it off and go down from there. Either way works, if you make at least the minimum payment on all cards.

Debt settlement

If your bills have reached the stage where there is no chance you can pay the full amount, this is an option. Debt settlement companies can help you reduce the amount you pay by 25%-50%, but it becomes a severe negative mark on your credit report for seven years and will damage your credit score. You also must pay taxes on any amount the lender forgives. Be careful of this, especially if you hope to buy a house or car in the near future.

Borrow from your 401k

Rules vary on this, but usually, you are allowed to borrow up to 50% of your retirement fund to a maximum of $50,000 and pay it back within five years. The interest rate is low (usually prime plus 1%), but there are risks here. There are tax consequences and penalties for withdrawing from a 401k and you lose a lot of the power of compounding interest that helps the account grow. Only consider this as a last resort.

Debt Consolidation vs. Debt Settlement

Debt consolidation and debt settlement are not the same. In fact, they are very different in how they work and the results that should be expected.

Debt consolidation is the process of combining bills from multiple creditors into one large bill and either taking out a loan or using a debt management program to pay it off. Debt consolidation tries to reduce the interest rate on debt and lower the monthly payments to help the consumer gradually pay off all debts in a 3-5 year time span.

Debt consolidation will lower your credit score slightly for a short period of time, but it will rebound quickly – and actually improve – if you make on-time payments.

Debt settlement, by contrast, is an attempt to reduce the amount owed. Ideally, the lenders will accept a lump-sum payment and forgive a portion of the debt, usually somewhere between 25% and 50%. On very small amounts of debt, this could happen in as little as six months to a year, but as the size of the debt grows, it easily could take 3-5 years to settle.

In the meantime, your credit score will fall, perhaps as much as 75-150 points (depending on your original status) because of nonpayment. Once the bill is settled, it remains on your credit report for seven years and has a negative impact on your credit score.

Signs That Debt Consolidation Is a Bad Idea

Debt consolidation is not for everyone. Here are signs that you should consider alternatives:

  • Missing monthly mortgage or rent payments
  • Falling behind on utility bills
  • Maxing out your credit cards
  • Receiving calls from debt collectors

If you aren’t sure whether you can pull yourself out of a financial mess, call a nonprofit credit counseling agency and ask for advice. Be sure the agency’s credit counselors are certified by the National Foundation for Credit Counseling. Ask them to review your assets and expenses and recommend a course of action. The call is free.

If you are not a viable candidate for debt consolidation, they could recommend bankruptcy. Despite its reputation, bankruptcy is not a financial death sentence. It is a chance to start over and with the right direction from a bankruptcy attorney, you could be back on your feet financially in as little as two years.

Debt Consolidating Loan vs. the InCharge Debt Consolidating Alternative

Debt Consolidation Loan

  1. Take out a new debt consolidation loan
  2. Pay high loan origination costs
  3. May be turned down if your credit score is low
  4. Consolidation interest rates may be high
  5. One consolidated monthly payment
  6. New large loan pays off several smaller loans
  7. May not qualify because of high debt-to-income ratio

InCharge Debt Consolidation Alternative

  1. No new debt consolidation loan
  2. InCharge helps you secure lower interest rates with your creditors
  3. One monthly payment to InCharge (InCharge divides it up among your creditors)
  4. No hefty loan origination fees (because there is no new loan)
  5. Interest rates will be lower, in most cases
  6. Access to free debt counselors and support, helping you stay the course to become debt free
  7. Access to exclusive educational material
  8. Referrals to other nonprofit companies that can help you with other problems

Frequently Asked Questions

How Does Debt Consolidation Affect Your Credit Score?

Debt consolidation should have a positive effect on your credit score because it will reduce the credit utilization that accounts for 30% of your credit score.

The fact that you enrolled indicates that you overspent with credit cards and that is a negative in computing your credit score.  Credit utilization is the percentage of spending based on your credit limit. If you have a $1,000 credit limit and charge $500 on your credit card, you have a credit utilization ratio of 50%. Lenders want to see you spend 30% or less of your credit limit each month.

The reason most consumers consolidate debt is because they have maxed-out multiple credit cards, which obviously puts them well over their credit utilization ratio.

The credit utilization ratio only considers revolving lines of credit and not installment loans. Transferring your debts from credit cards to a consolidation loan will reduce your credit utilization ratio and improve your credit score.

Most credit counselors advise you to close credit accounts when consolidating credit. This is a good idea if it stops you from using multiple credit cards to rack up debt.  Just understand that your credit score will take an initial hit from closing credit accounts. Length of credit history makes up 15% of a credit score, and the older the credit account, the better it is for your score.

This shouldn’t be an issue since your primary goal should be paying off your debt. Until then, your credit score isn’t important.  What’s more important is to make your monthly payments, and, in the future, keep your credit card balance below 30% of the limit. Payment history and utilization ratio account for 65% of your credit score.

How to Consolidate Debt with Bad Credit

It’s possible to consolidate debt when you have bad credit, but you should be prepared to pay more to do so. Bad credit typically causes your credit score to suffer and lenders want credit score of 650 or higher to consider you for a good interest rate. Anything below that and you will be paying subprime (aka “high”) interest rates.

Before you apply for a loan, check your credit report and credit score. If it is too low, give yourself time to beef it up by making on-time payments on all your accounts. If you need help faster, ask a friend or relative with a great credit score to co-sign the loan, or ask them to loan you the money themselves.

Other possible alternatives include debt management programs, home equity loans, online lenders and, if the situation is really desperate, payday loans.

How do I prepare for a debt consolidation appointment?

Before reaching out to a debt consolidation company, take some time to go through the following debt consolidation checklist:

  1. Figure out your total credit card debt: that’s all of your balances added together
  2. Calculate the average interest rate you are currently paying for your debt. Try to find a debt consolidator who will offer you an interest rate that is at least 3 to 5 percent lower.
  3. Add up how much credit card interest you paid last month.
  4. Add up the total of your current minimum payments. If you can’t afford your current minimums, and a debt consolidator gives you an estimated consolidated monthly payment that is equal to or greater than your current minimums, you can’t afford that either.

Should I get a debt consolidation loan to pay off credit cards?

There is no definitive answer for this because each consumer’s situation has unique factors to account for, but generally speaking, a debt consolidation loan is a good way to pay off credit cards if it reduces the amount of interest you’re paying on your debt and simplifies the payment process.

In most cases, having multiple credit cards means keeping up with varying interest rates, minimum payments and due dates for payments. That can be a dizzying experience that leads to frustration and defeat.

A debt consolidation loan shrinks your obligations to a single payment to single lender, once a month. If nothing else, it’s makes drawing up and sticking to a budget easier.

The problem comes in doing the calculations necessary to confirm that there also is a financial gain to using a single loan to pay off unsecured debt. That takes time and discipline, but if done properly, you could find out that a debt consolidation loan is not only easier to handle, it’s more beneficial financially.

Is it a Good Idea to Consolidate Debt?

Now that you know how to consolidate debt, the next question you might be asking yourself is: is it a good idea to consolidate debt? While traditional debt consolidation loans can end up hurting your credit or tempt you to start using your credit cards again once they are paid off, the debt consolidation alternative provided by InCharge has few downsides. You are getting the convenience of consolidating your debt into one payment, lower interest rates and a path to paying off your debt in three to five years. You won’t be able to use your credit cards after enrolling, so you won’t be tempted to acquire more debt. In summary, yes, it is a good idea to consolidate debt. Get started today by calling or starting online debt consolidation.

See how much you can save with Debt Consolidation

How Nonprofit Debt Consolidation Works

A nonprofit debt consolidation program offers many of the benefits of traditional debt consolidation with few of the negatives.

Learn More

Online Debt Consolidation

You can enroll in an online debt consolidation program, if you qualify through nonprofit credit counseling.

Learn More

Credit Consolidation

Learn the pros and cons of different credit consolidation options including online consolidation loans from Lending Club, Debt Settlement options and nonprofit debt consolidation services.

Learn More

Sources

NA, ND. Debt Consolidation. Retrieved from https://www.debt.org/consolidation/

NA. (2017, September) Average Credit Card Debt in America: 2017 Facts & Figures. Retrieved from https://www.valuepenguin.com/average-credit-card-debt

NA. ND. Debt Consolidation Loans. Retrieved from http://www.moneymeters.org/debt-consolidation/debt-consolidation-loans.php

NA. (2017, September) Personal Loans: Estimated offers for $10,000. Retrieved from https://www.nerdwallet.com/personal-loans/debt-consolidation-loans