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'Upside Down' Car Deals Turn Finances Inside Out

'Upside Down' Car Deals

To this day, I'm amazed at how my...
Lindell Is "That Kid" Yelling On The Sidelines

Yelling On The Sidelines

The beginning of Spring sports means new reminders for adult spectators to be gentle with young athletes. Signs posted at Little League fields outline parent "do's" and......
A Money Intervention

A Money Intervention

I vividly recall the 1978 television documentary "Scared Straight," about inmates serving anywhere from 25 years to life trying to scare juvenile delinquents......
Why Newspapers Won't Die

Why Newspapers Won't Die

When I teach journalism, I begin by asking the students three questions: 1) How many of you want ...

I hadn't flown in a commercial airplane for 17 years. Yes, even though both my husband, Dustin, and my dad are Navy pilots. After 9/11, I honestly thought I'd never would fly again.

Although a municipality filing for bankruptcy protection is rare, you still ought to be paying attention to what happens to bondholders in the case of Detroit.

When I tell people I live in Maine, they almost always ask about the moose. And it turns out there are many misconceptions about moose, such as the idea that they outnumber people in Maine, but the biggest of all is probably that they exist to begin with.

I don't begrudge people who profit from personal life experiences. There's often something we can learn from other people's dramas and traumas.

Although due to volume, I can't personally answer all my mail, I occasionally pull together questions sent to me about recent columns.

Just in time (or not—keep reading), and on the heels of my previous columns about fatherhood and the military, comes Armin Brott's book "The Military Father: A Hands-on Guide for Deployed Dads."

We know that many students have to borrow in order to attend college. On top of that, the interest rates on many new federal student loans doubled on July 1 from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent.

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